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What are you reading at the moment?
  • I’m reading Komozi Woodard’s A Nation within a Nation: Amiri Baraka (LeRoi Jones) & Black Power Politics. A very interesting history of both Newark and national activism in the 1970s, but with this insane, bloated opening chapter that literally tries to tell the ENTIRE history of black America from slavery through the 1960s. How this 50-page tangent avoided the editorial axe, I have no idea. It’s really out of place and pointless, unless the assumption is that the hypothetical reader knows nothing about African American history and just happens to be reading a scholarly monograph.

    The parentheses inside the title are pretty awkward too, but I guess forgivable.

  • Other than that opening chapter, that sounds incredible. I’m a pretty big Amiri Baraka fan too.

  • I might have been a little hard on the opening chapter—it’s a serviceable survey of Black history, but I was pretty impatient for it to get to the goddamn 1960s. Baraka is a fascinating guy—brilliant, though with serious problems (his gender politics, his perverse subservience to the younger, frankly less brilliant Maulana Karenga for several years in the late 60s/early 70s…oh, and that post-9/11 poem, sigh)—and I have a newfound appreciation for his intellectual and political work from reading this.

    There’s an event in Newark celebrating the 50th anniversary of his Blues People, and he’ll be speaking. That same night, there’s a rare leftist film screening in Philly; I had already decided on the latter event, but now I’m torn.

  • So people still really use Goodreads a lot? I hadn’t signed on in a long time and was surprised how active it was. I’m trying to find something to read besides pre 20th century novels, and finding too many people enthralled with what I normally read.

  • I use it like a motherfucker

  • I can mostly only recommend comic books though

  • Goodreads is absolutely one of my 3 or 4 favorite web places.

  • I’m not very engaged with Goodreads, but I do use it as a log. I don’t write reviews, but I assign stars, and that’s about it.

    Soon there will be rather few stars for Philip Roth’s 2008 novel Indignation, which I am reading solely because it was on a free shelf as I left the library, looked short, and fell by chance into a week when I had a lot of train riding and not much mental energy for challenging reading. It’s pretty crappy, and I’m bummed that I wasted my time on it. (Here’s the plot, in its entirety, with 30 pages left to go: kid from Jersey goes to college in Ohio in 1951, receives blowjob, then a handjob, then argues philosophy with a dean at college, then goes off to Korea, all of which is precisely as artful and riveting as I’ve made it sound).

  • Couple of minor alterations and you have my life story there.

  • I started listening to the audio version of Gone Girl on my commute this morning. I’m pretty hooked so far!

  • I had just started that, but then got distracted by The Luminaries, which is so far riveting. Might return to Gone Girl afterwards, though

  • Man, I don’t know what to write about it exactly but I found the copy of ‘A Traveler from Altruria’ I bought a long time ago, and started reading it and its kind of blowing my mind. Its written by W.D. Howells, a well known figure known more for his polite middle class novels that dealt somewhat with the new wealth of the era, but this is a more philosophical discourse that gets down and dirty with the class politics of the day, the contradictions between America’s commercial zeal and its professed ‘democratic’ ideals, higher education vs. business, everything I imagined an author of W.D. Howells who seemed to float on wide public approval wouldn’t touch.

    All this is done through the device of a narrator (the author) and a person traveling from a pseudo-mythical utopia called Altruria. The action all takes place at a middle/upper class summer resort in the northeast, and the interaction is between the narrator and the Altrurian, and all the standard wealthy visitors or the rural farmers nearby. I can’t really come up with a better description than that, but the conversation is so to the point - basically offering the perspectives of unapologetic capitalism and classism - that it blows my mind it never made such an impact then, or survives really in any sense today. Shit is so relevant though. For the LPTJ buzz it would make you want to pull out your hair for the harshness of the viewpoints of labor vs. capital, but I’m amazed this book goes this far in the first place.

    All of which is to say there’s this cool book I’m reading, that its almost impossible to find a new copy of, but its worth trying if you have some time set aside and want to vent at 19th century America.

  • I withdraw my support of Gone Girl. It’s a great thriller, as far as that goes, and Flynn does some really interesting and genuinely disturbing things playing around with reader expectations, but it’s just so nihilistic and cold. About a third of the way in, I actively started hating it, and I hated it even a little more once I was finished. That’s certainly not because it’s a bad book, and it’s not because it’s a slog (it’s actually quite the page-turner). It just made me feel depressed and angry.

    Oddly enough, I just started The Luminaries myself!

    I’m also reading Fangirl by Rainbow Rowell, basically a cute romance novel about a shut-in college freshman who moonlights as a crazy popular fanfic writer online (her subject is a Harry Potter sort of thing). Rowell’s books are fucking delightful, seriously.

  • Joe, that’s interesting re: Howells. I’ve never read him myself, but I’ve read scholarship that was partially about him (and have a friend writing a dissertation on him, for reasons that are beyond me and, apparently, based on the way he talks about it, him too), and “polite middle class novels” was always my vague impression too.

    re: Gone Girl, I appreciated the bleak nihilism, I just felt like most of it was lifted wholesale from Jim Thompson and Charles Willeford—more than just general homage-style tone, all the way down to plot points. Flynn has some writing skills, but also defaults relentlessly to over-written, unnecessary internal monologues that explicate Every. Single. Thing. Endlessly. That’s the part I hated, that ultimately turned me against the book. Over a year later, though, parts of it have stuck with me, and I can’t say that about everything I read.

    Meanwhile, I just read Howard Street, by Nathan Heard, from 1968. Does anyone know him? He wrote this in prison; it’s set in Newark, and trawls the same ground as Iceberg Slim and Donald Goines, but with some slightly more literary ambition than their writing-degree-zero style. It’s a mean novel with all sorts of predictably problematic moments, but it packs a punch. Definitely recommended to peeps who are into this sort of thing. I’m not sure why Heard seems so much less known than his peers.

  • I am simultaneously and slowly reading Rendevous With Rama and At the Mountains of Madness (Arthur C Clarke, and HP Lovecraft respectively) and I’m finding them quite similar. I’m not a very dedicated reader these days. Social media has rotted my brain, so anything harder than a facebook status update takes real effort to read. BUt I’m enjoying them. I’d like to pay better attention, and I keep forgetting who everyone is. I’m going to read more of Rama on my plane flight in a minute…

  • I’m reading The Way Of Kings by Brandon Sanderson. I’m only about halfway through it, and from what I’ve read this review pretty much nails it: http://www.sfreviews.net/sanderson_way_of_kings.html But since I’m a fan of immersive worldbuilding, I’m probably a bit more forgiving than the reviewer. I’m reading it in chunks on the train and it’s taking me longer than it’s ever taken me to read a book that way, including GRRM’s and Erikson’s books, if that tells you anything.

  • I’ve just finished Rupert Thomson’s Secrecy, which I’d definitely recommend for anyone interested in sinister and tense story-within-a-story literary fiction about Dominican monks with a sideline in torture and death-obsessed Italian sculptors.

    Intermittently, I’ve been dipping in and out of this, too (my daughters got me Vol.1 and 2 for Fathers’ Day a while back).

    jg

  • Jim, I read to the part comparing it to Robert Jordan and decided that it wasn’t worth the effort.

    I found an old Dragonlance novel at the charity shop and am reading that inbetween more “serious” reading. At first I was amazed by how terrible it was, but now I think that it’s a somewhat decent G-rated D&D adventure module in novel form, studded by weird random cartoonish ultraviolence of people getting melted by acid and smiths getting their extremities chopped off.

    Next up: alternating Faulkner/Moorcook/Bronte/Victor Pelevin.

  • I think Brandon Sanderson can’t really avoid being compared to Robert Jordan, since he was the one chosen to finish the Wheel of Time series after Jordan snuffed it. One thing you can say for him over RJ though—he did actually finish the series.

  • I really wanna geek out about how much I fucking love the Years of Lyndon Johnson by Robert Caro but I’m just too tired to type much. I am on Vol 3, which covers his years in the Senate, and while it’s probably been the slowest book on the whole, it’s picking up now after Eisenhower’s election with Johnson having become minority leader and very quickly reworked the ingrained seniority system to his advantage. Caro is so, so good. I can’t wait to finally read the Power Broker

  • I couldn’t find what I was actually looking for in the book shop yesterday and seem to have come home with Julian Cope’s book. Not sure.

  • Which one is that?

    I’ve been reading three different books (maybe four, I lose track) lately, making very slow progress on each because concentration is difficult:

    • Greg Grandin’s Fordlandia, a detailed and entertaining historical account of Henry Ford’s ill-fated attempt to build a model American city in the Amazonian jungle in the 20s

    • Nicolas Bouvier’s The Scorpion Fish, which is an autobiographical account of being stuck for months in a village in Sri Lanka crawling with insects, sick, depressed, and suffering from crazy hallucinations

    • Joan Didion’s Political Fictions, because I thought some Joan Didion wouldn’t be bad

    • William Friedkin’s memoir The Friedkin Connection, which overall is neither very good nor even that informative

  • edison said: Which one is that?

    jc

  • I don’t think I’ve heard of that one - let us know how it is once you get to it!

  • I wonder how many people started reading Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s work thanks to her being sampled by Beyonce, cos that’s how I came to her, and I’ve been enjoying her a lot. I read Half of a Yellow Sun while I was in Melbourne and thought it was great; she’s a good enough writer that you forget there’s a person behind writing this book, and are just reading it. Not quite as sold on Americanah, her latest one, but her observations about African Americans from the view of African migrants (in this case mostly Nigerian, but she talks about it generally in the book) are interesting. I don’t generally read many novels, but I’m going through these quite easily.

  • I’ve been on a diet of photography monographs and science fiction novels all summer. Pretty much rules.

  • AnnetheMan said: I wonder how many people started reading Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s work thanks to her being sampled by Beyonce, cos that’s how I came to her, and I’ve been enjoying her a lot. I read Half of a Yellow Sun while I was in Melbourne and thought it was great; she’s a good enough writer that you forget there’s a person behind writing this book, and are just reading it. Not quite as sold on Americanah, her latest one, but her observations about African Americans from the view of African migrants (in this case mostly Nigerian, but she talks about it generally in the book) are interesting. I don’t generally read many novels, but I’m going through these quite easily.

    I read Purple Hibiscus ages ago, I think maybe in an undergrad Women’s Studies class? Intense/heavy, gripping stuff if I recall correctly. A lot of domestic violence. I think you’d probably find it interesting.

  • Yeah I read it while I was on holiday. I enjoyed it, though not as much as the others. I liked how she got across that shyness you have when you’ve come from an abusive situation and this sort of bemusement as to how other people talk and laugh and interact with other people so easily. Obvs you don’t have to have been in abusive situations to feel like that, but it adds to it.

    I’m trying to read Understanding Media by Marshall McLuhan periodically, but it’s like walking through a cloud of gas and trying to pin bits of it down.

  • I’m a couple of hundred pages into Moby Dick. Parts of it are stunning. The writing is so beautiful it makes you run around the house reading bits out loud to people. The story as such hasn’t really started yet, but the atmosphere and context is set so vividly, you just get a bit lost in it. As always with reading, my problem is staying awake for more than 10 pages, being generally exhausted by other things. My copy also has a lovely, waxy cover and a very handsome photograph of Herman inside. Mine’s not kindle, but this is the cover art anyway:

    herm

    I picked up an Ian McEwan that I haven’t read in a charity shop in the week too - Enduring Love, so that might be next on my list when I eventually disembark from The Pequod. Apparently, it has a famously exciting opening chapter, but I don’t know, or want to know, much more than that at the moment.

    Still have Julian Cope and Ballard on the boil. The Ballard stories are good to dip in and out of. I’m looking forward to getting into the JC one, but didn’t really get off the ground with it first time round.

    fishroad

    Also, with the Booker Prize being in the news, I’ve remembered how much I loved Richard Flanagan’s Gould’s Book Of Fish a few years ago, so I would like to read his nominated book, The Narrow Road To The Deep North, based on his father’s experiences on the Burma railway. Another recent novel I want to read, but wiull probably wait for a paperback release, is David Mitchell’s last one, The Bone Clocks. I loved The Thousand Autumns Of Jacob de Zoet, his one before that, and quite liked Cloud Atlas and Ghostwritten too.

    beside

    One book on the Booker shortlist I did read was, We Are All Completely Beside Ourselves by Karen Joy Fowler, an American novel which is hard to talk about because it has a plot twist 100 pages in that is at the heart of the story. Anyway, I loved it and I hope it wins as its a complete underdog.

    eyes

    Meanwhile, my daughter Ellie is reading a fe wthings that we talk about. She’s moved into early adult/teen stuff now, and some of it’s quite tense! At the moment, she’s into Close Your Pretty Eyes by Sally Nicholls, about a girl who discovers the macabre story of the Victorian baby farms and the child-murderer, Amelia Dyer. It’s a long way from Peter Rabbit, that’s for sure.

    wake

    Oh yes, almost forgot to mention. Another book I loved this year was Paul Kingsnorth’s The Wake, set in 1066 and written in a ‘shadow-Middle English’. It’s more a portrait of a man’s descent into madness and obsession (seems to be a theme I’m drawn to recently!) and was a reader-funded publication initially. It’s great!

    I hope I haven’t repeated myself with any of that. I don’t seem to be able to see earlier pages in this thread for some reason.

  • I’ve heard so many interview with Richard Flanagan over the last few days (though last night I heard the repeat of a radio program interviewing one of the non-winning short listers, which was interesting) that I’m kind of intrigued.

    I’ve recently finished Garth Nix’s most recent book http://www.oldkingdom.com.au/clariel.html which was really good in that YA fiction way. Also recently read my way through Arthur C Clarke’s Rama series, which, yeah…pretty good, in a pulpy way for the last 3. I initially read Rendevous With Rama at the same time I was reading Lovecraft At the Mountains of Madness and was struck by the similarities. It was fascinating.

  • Just finishing reading Michael Morpurgo’s Private Peaceful (aloud) with Ellie. He really is such a good writer, by far the best children’s writer I’ve read. I must admit I struggled to get through some of it without a bit of a lump in the throat though.

  • Ha. I’ve been meaning to check that one out.

    I’m currently plowing through the Harry Potter series for the first time and enjoying it quite a lot.

  • Somebody recommend me some books to read please, my Kindle shat the bed and I went out and got a library card but I usually have to request anything interesting via interlibrary loan

    I just finished The Abominable by Dan Simmons, which I actually dug, and I may have to take another whack at The Terror sometime soon but I need a bit of a palate cleanser first. I’m basically a genre guy, fantasy, sci fi, crime fiction, etc., but I’ll give almost anything a try as long as it lends itself to commute reading (which essentially does limit me to short-attention-span genre fare).

  • nickinko said:  wake

    Oh yes, almost forgot to mention. Another book I loved this year was Paul Kingsnorth’s The Wake, set in 1066 and written in a ‘shadow-Middle English’. It’s more a portrait of a man’s descent into madness and obsession (seems to be a theme I’m drawn to recently!) and was a reader-funded publication initially. It’s great!

    I’m on my second run through this at the moment, so much did I enjoy it the first time around. The language thing is so well pitched, for me at least - weird enough to drag you into this other world but familiar enough that you don’t really ever get stumped without any idea what he’s talking about. The book really pulls on a few of my big enthusiasms/obsessions: the old english language and the culture and events that it was used to discuss/chronicle, all those ideas about how humans relate to the “natural” world and how the world changes around them (either in spite or because of them), and also the general sense of dread and powerlessness of knowing that something troubling is coming whether you like it or not (the passages in the book that deal with that for the world of 1066 really sang for me. I can’t remember the wording now but for example the bit at the start asking “who looks to the sky when it brings only rain, who listens to people who bring only bad news, who will look into the deep mere when there seems no end to its blackness?” etc.). I also loved that the story ended up being about none of those things primarily but about the individual’s tale, because I think it would have been very easy for a man as engaged with all sorts of political/literary movements as he is to let his novel turn into an attempt at some kind of all-encompassing “message” thing.

    But anyway yes, I really loved that book. Apparently he is now planning to write two “sequels”, though it wasn’t intended to be part of a series. The first is to be set in our present day and another is set about 1000 years into the future. I’m curious to see how he approaches them, whether they actually relate much to this book, and of course what he decides to do with language in either of them!

    If you liked the language thing in The Wake, the other book I’m reading at the moment is Sunset Song by Lewis Grassic Gibbon, which is itself the first of three books, in this case three books that make up “A Scots Quair”. The story proper kicks off around the start of the 20th century in a tiny farming community, but the introduction tells the story of the place right back as far as the collective memory can go (standing stones, viking invasions, etc.) and then carries on talking about the actual action of the story in the same gruff local language and bad tempered good humour (if you know what I mean by that), and it’s written mostly in English but twisted to better match the local phrasings and vocabulary of that particular place and time. It’s really quite something, especially if you have any interest in Scottish culture or rural/isolated community life in general, and once again the deliberate language choices play a massive part in bringing the world to life and are often just a pleasure to read in their own right.

  • Great write-up alistair, thanks! By the way, we must have discussed this before, I feel, but do you know Riddley Walker by Russell Hoban? It fits in with this area of a novel written in a constructed language, and although it’s set in an imagined future, 2,000 years after an apocalypse, the language and landscape are more medieval than science fiction.

    I will look out for Sunset Song. This also reminded me of the brilliant How Late It Was, How Late, by James Kelman, written in a Scottish dialect back in the 90s when such a thing would still cause a controversy. It’s a wonderfully vivid and touching story which pieces together this man’s life in a really interesting way. But again, I suspect you’ll know it already.

  • I haven’t read either of those but I’ll definitely note them somewhere for next time I’m out of books - thanks for the recommendations.

    I feel like I barely get through two books a year at the moment so could definitely use some reasons to get on with it. My train journey’s a lot shorter than it used to be and I haven’t quite found a replacement time in my routine yet.

  • So I just finished W.G.Sebald’s Austerlitz, ostensibly the story of a man who gradually pieces together his own history as a child evacuee from occupied Czechoslovakia. I found it hard going and flat at times, but it gradually sucked me in and by about halfway through, when the Prague stuff starts, I really liked it. I might try one more by him - has anyone read any?

    Now I’m reading Cold Mountain by Charles Frazier. Fantastic so far. cold

  • I read Charles Frazier’s Nightwoods a couple of months ago and liked that quite a bit!

  • Nick, I’m a big fan of Sebald, and in fact I’m currently right in the middle of The Rings of Saturn, which I’ve found to be sort of a consensus favorite among literary types. I’d suggest that one, if you’re looking to give him one more chance. It’s a powerfully odd, dense little book, but certainly of a piece with the rest of his oeuvre. I’ve also read Austerlitz, which I loved, and Vertigo, which was my introduction. I don’t remember being utterly taken with it at the time, but it stuck in my mind for years until I finally had to revisit him around the time Austerlitz came out.

    Your experience reading Austerlitz is not uncommon. Sebald writes in a sort of refined, hypnotic drone — absolutely unique in the world — and it takes a while to get oneself on the same wavelength. There’s also this constant struggle between memory & fiction that reinforces the effect. “Dreamlike” is an over-used term, perhaps, but I’ve never read anything that deserves the tag more than Sebald’s novels.

    I’m reading tons of stuff all at the same time right now, and I’m starting to lose the threads. In addition to The Rings of Saturn, I’m revisiting O’Brian’s Master & Commander via audiobook on my commute (the reader is incredibly good and I’ve been enjoying the hell out of it). Before that, I was listening to Oryx & Crake, but I had to put that on hold because my time ran out. I’ll finish it soon. I’m also taking my time with an art book of Kodachrome photography from the 70s & 80s by a former National Geographic photographer named Nathan Benn. Over the past couple years, I’ve become enormously interested in photography, so I always have one book or another to page through. In tandem with all that, I’m reading through Susan Sontag’s collection of essays, On Photography, which is just brilliant.

    This morning I hope to finish Sex Criminals, Vol. 1. It’s been really fun so far.

    And last but not least, I’m reading a fun little sci-fi epic called The Search for WondLa with Finn. It’s by the Spiderwick Chronicles guy. Whew!

    After all this, I hope to dive into some vintage science fiction for a while. I’ve got a long list to get through, but first things first, I think it’s time I read Dune.

  • Jim, did you ever read The Passage by Justin Cronin? Something tells me you did.

    In that case, I’d recommend The Expanse series by James S.A. Corey, beginning with Leviathan Wakes. There are currently four books, all of them fantastic, and a fifth is coming out soon. Syfy is spending gobs of money on a rad-looking adaptation that should premiere sometime in the next 6 months.

    Station Eleven and The Martian are two other absolutely brilliant science fiction novels from the past year or so.

  • Hi davy,

    I read The Martian and it was great. I haven’t read The Passage. I’ll check that out and the others you mentioned.

  • davy said: Nick, I’m a big fan of Sebald, and in fact I’m currently right in the middle of The Rings of Saturn, which I’ve found to be sort of a consensus favorite among literary types. I’d suggest that one, if you’re looking to give him one more chance. It’s a powerfully odd, dense little book, but certainly of a piece with the rest of his oeuvre. I’ve also read Austerlitz, which I loved, and Vertigo, which was my introduction. I don’t remember being utterly taken with it at the time, but it stuck in my mind for years until I finally had to revisit him around the time Austerlitz came out.

    Your experience reading Austerlitz is not uncommon. Sebald writes in a sort of refined, hypnotic drone — absolutely unique in the world — and it takes a while to get oneself on the same wavelength. There’s also this constant struggle between memory & fiction that reinforces the effect. “Dreamlike” is an over-used term, perhaps, but I’ve never read anything that deserves the tag more than Sebald’s novels.

    This is great, davy. Spot on! Actually, the friend who gave me Austerlitz said he’d tried to find The Rings Of Saturn originally (his favourite), so that seems to be the one I need to read next.

  • Sunset Song turned out to be just beautifully sad.

    I have the other two books in the sequence, but I needed a break so I read The Blind Assassin by Margaret Atwood, which my partner bought for me as a present and which I really liked. It was funny how similar the war stories were in that to the ones in Sunset Song, actually - it left me feeling a bit strange that all the war literature we get taught in schools here is about what it’s like to be a soldier, and these two books both told almost identical stories about what it’s like being a woman watching all the men you know disappear, or return kind of broken and with your relationship to them broken too. But anyway, the war wasn’t the main focus of either book, and The Blind Assassin was mostly about women and class and family and what it’s like to get old. It was good.

    Then I went back to Gibbon and the second book Cloud Howe which was really good and different but the same as Sunset Song. A bit more negative towards the other people in the world, and a little less hopeful in places.

    And I’ve just finished H Is For Hawk by Helen MacDonald. It’s a nonfiction story about training a hawk, reading other people’s accounts of training hawks (notably the novelist T H White), and coping with losing a parent before you were ready to lose them. The hawk stuff is fascinating, the grief stuff is sad and well-understood in the author’s hindsight, and the book as a whole does a good job of capturing a sense of what the world can be if we stop thinking of ourselves as being separate from “nature”. MacDonald is a little too fond of the full stop and particularly of using short sentences for impact, to the point that sometimes you’ll get three or even four of these short, blunt sentences at the end of one paragraph, but other than that the writing is good and I’d happily recommend it.

    Next up is Riddley Walker, thanks to Nick’s recommendation above, which I’m about 20 pages into at the moment and already enjoying.

  • alistair said: Next up is Riddley Walker, thanks to Nick’s recommendation above, which I’m about 20 pages into at the moment and already enjoying.

    Hope you enjoy it. I read it more than 20 years ago, but it opened my mind a bit and I’ve always remembered it fondly. The hart of the would. :-)

  • davy: I sort of dug The Passage—really liked the idea and the setup but I think that partway through it kind of got cinematic, but in a bad way? Like, I started noticing more and more action movie tropes. Like I said though, the idea and maybe the first third of it were really good though, and the rest of it wasn’t bad, more mixed.

    I just finished Leviathan Wakes, also based on your recommendation, and I liked it a lot. I’m starting on Caliban’s War now. I just checked out the SyFy trailer and maybe it’ll be good, maybe it won’t, hard to tell, but it does look like they’re taking it seriously at least.

  • My thoughts exactly. Even if it’s bad, it will at least be substantially bad — sorta like the last season of Battlestar Galactica.

    Glad you liked the book! You’re in for a treat: Caliban’s War might be my favorite book in the series so far. Can’t wait for #5 in a couple months.

  • Unfortunately, the sequel to The Passage — The Twelve, I think it’s called? — is not nearly as strong. Like The Passage, it starts off pretty great and then gets expansive and less character-driven and a bit messy. It’s still worth a read, but it’s not essential. I’ll be in line for the third book all the same.

  • I very much enjoyed Riddley Walker. Really strange and wild-feeling book! I’m not sure I was entirely convinced by all the plot points but I feel like the plot was barely the point, and I loved the dance of myth and history and the “present day” story developing around and into both. Like the central character says of himself, the book is full of questions and not many answers, in a world where everyone else seems to be full of answers that never quite convince.

  • Great to hear! It’s one I should re-read.